Author Topic: Video Games in 1918: Back to Basics  (Read 133 times)

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aimaina

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Re: Video Games in 1918: Back to Basics
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2018, 05:32:00 PM »
i think the fact that theres a big checklist of moons to get in mario makes a big difference, plus the hint system makes it actually feasible to find them all on your own, so theres more pressure to "do everything".... in botw 100% is basically hopeless so u just do as much as you want. i feel like thats either a strength or a weakness depending on how you feel about completionism in videogame

aimaina

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Re: Video Games in 1918: Back to Basics
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2018, 05:37:03 PM »
i think its cool in some ways that im leaving behind breath of the weath with a bunch of things left as mysterys but i also liked the sense of closure from getting all the moons in mario.... idk

Giik

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Re: Video Games in 1918: Back to Basics
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2018, 08:46:08 PM »
in 2017 i didn't really buy that much vidya mostly because the switch was 'spensive (botw and odyssey were grEAT though)

i think that trend will kinda continue for this year, i'm not really keeping track of upcoming game releases outside of what nintendo directs and stuff announces.

lately though i've been playing stardew, rain world, children of zodiarcs, and wonder wickets (beta testing!~). all of them seem pretty underrated except for stardew so i'd say check 'em out

and of course there's my own game wink wink nudge nudge
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 08:49:59 PM by Giik »

hubol

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Re: Video Games in 1918: Back to Basics
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2018, 11:44:48 PM »
i think the fact that theres a big checklist of moons to get in mario makes a big difference, plus the hint system makes it actually feasible to find them all on your own, so theres more pressure to "do everything".... in botw 100% is basically hopeless so u just do as much as you want. i feel like thats either a strength or a weakness depending on how you feel about completionism in videogame

yeha lol!!!! this seems about right! i guess mario's way of doing it doesnt work for me but i can totally see why the zeldon one would be really frustrating for hard-cored completionists......

and of course there's my own game wink wink nudge nudge

wear's the cutey thread about your new game?????? cutey thread or it didnt happen

Giik

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Re: Video Games in 1918: Back to Basics
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2018, 04:25:06 AM »
i think the fact that theres a big checklist of moons to get in mario makes a big difference, plus the hint system makes it actually feasible to find them all on your own, so theres more pressure to "do everything".... in botw 100% is basically hopeless so u just do as much as you want. i feel like thats either a strength or a weakness depending on how you feel about completionism in videogame

yeha lol!!!! this seems about right! i guess mario's way of doing it doesnt work for me but i can totally see why the zeldon one would be really frustrating for hard-cored completionists......

and of course there's my own game wink wink nudge nudge

wear's the cutey thread about your new game?????? cutey thread or it didnt happen
i mean http://cutey.zone/index.php?topic=117.0 is kinda where i talked about it but i don't have a dedicated thread for it yet

juner

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Re: Video Games in 1918: Back to Basics
« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2018, 01:47:34 PM »
Uurnog Uurnlimited is a cool game, i'm glad Nifflas made a spiritual successor to Lyle In Cube Sector!

and of course there's my own game wink wink nudge nudge

Oceanfarm is looking good! The water splash effects are v cute and knowledge-based progression is always a thing i get excited about

SquareWheel

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Re: Video Games in 1918: Back to Basics
« Reply #21 on: January 18, 2018, 02:10:43 PM »
I actually played a bit of Uurnog from the Humble Trove.  Didn't grab me enough to finish it, but it had some interesting mechanics and puzzles.  Lots of different solutions to approach problems.

Though I think I died and lost all my money, so I lost interest at that point.

Giik

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Re: Video Games in 1918: Back to Basics
« Reply #22 on: January 18, 2018, 11:33:49 PM »
Uurnog Uurnlimited is a cool game, i'm glad Nifflas made a spiritual successor to Lyle In Cube Sector!

and of course there's my own game wink wink nudge nudge

Oceanfarm is looking good! The water splash effects are v cute and knowledge-based progression is always a thing i get excited about
okay do you mean like adding things to a journal in-game or the roguelike-esque "i'm good at the game because i played it like 500 times"

because both are hell yeah

juner

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Re: Video Games in 1918: Back to Basics
« Reply #23 on: January 19, 2018, 12:53:31 AM »
okay do you mean like adding things to a journal in-game or the roguelike-esque "i'm good at the game because i played it like 500 times"

because both are hell yeah
the journal definitely! i guess i mean stuff like, there's obstacles or puzzles that are entirely possible to solve immediately but in likelihood you'll have to come back to em later on because you don't yet understand how to interact with or solve em, or even know that they're puzzles. i suppose i'm thinking of games like The Witness and Toki Tori 2, with the latter having a secret sequence-break right near the start of the game that new players will just overlook since they aren't yet aware of the puzzle mechanics and interactions that make it possible.

Giik

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Re: Video Games in 1918: Back to Basics
« Reply #24 on: January 19, 2018, 02:52:46 AM »
okay do you mean like adding things to a journal in-game or the roguelike-esque "i'm good at the game because i played it like 500 times"

because both are hell yeah
the journal definitely! i guess i mean stuff like, there's obstacles or puzzles that are entirely possible to solve immediately but in likelihood you'll have to come back to em later on because you don't yet understand how to interact with or solve em, or even know that they're puzzles. i suppose i'm thinking of games like The Witness and Toki Tori 2, with the latter having a secret sequence-break right near the start of the game that new players will just overlook since they aren't yet aware of the puzzle mechanics and interactions that make it possible.
Oh hell yeah that's some good shit

a good portion of the puzzles from the start won't be able to be solved though since you just haven't found the right plants yet, but if you know how to get to them you can totally route a speedrun